Nunavut - 2012 Policy Information  Nunavut

Nunavut is the newest territory to join the Federation of Canada separating from the North West Territories in 1999.  Nunavut comprises a major portion of Northern Canada, and most of the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, and has both the largest land base and the smallest population of the Canadian provinces and territories.  Small populations of some communities (Iqaluit, Rankin Inlet, and Nanisivic) have water supplied through above-ground piping (16%).  Generally Nunavut customers are delivered water through trucking.  Operating costs are high but there is a lower investment in construction and maintenance making it the most economical solution in the north.  Water usage among customers receiving trucked service is generally less than 200 L/capita/day.  

Use the links below to jump to a specific question:

Q1. Agencies Q9. Permitting Q17. Technical Assistance
Q2. Toilet Regulations   Q10. Drought Plans Q18. Volumetric Billing  
Q3. Showerhead Regulations Q11. Conservation Plans Q19. Metered Connections 
Q4. Urinal Regulations Q12. Authority to Approve Plans Q20. ET Microclimate Information  
Q5. Clothes Washer Regulations Q13. Plan Update Frequency Q21. Efficiency Strategy
Q6. PRSV Regulations Q14. Planning Framework Q22. Alternative Sources
Q7. Building or Plumbing Codes Q15. Implementation Requirements Additional Information
Q8. Water Loss Q16. Funding for Conservation

 

 

 

 

 



  1. What provincial ministry, department or agencies are in charge of drinking water conservation/efficiency?

    Nunavut Water Board

    The Nunavut Water Board (NWB) was created under the Nunavut Land Claims Agreement (“NCLA”) in 1996.  The NWB's mandate “over the use, management and regulation of inland water in Nunavut and its objects are to provide for the conservation and utilization of waters in Nunavut--except in national parks--in a manner that will provide the optimum benefits for the residents of Nunavut.”
     
  2. Does the province have a water consumption regulation for toilets that is more stringent than the federal standard?  

    Neither the federal nor Nunavut governments have a regulation for toilets at the point of sale.

    Although provincial building and plumbing codes can require water efficiency standards in new construction and renovations, and mandates minimum efficiency standards for energy consuming products, there is to date no federal regulation for mandating the water efficiency of toilets at the point of sale.

  3. Does the province have a water consumption regulation for showerheads that is more stringent than the federal standard? 

    Neither the federal nor Nunavut governments have a regulation for showerheads at the point of sale.

    Although provincial building and plumbing codes can require water efficiency standards in new construction and renovations, there is to date no federal regulation for mandating the water consumption/efficiency of showerheads at the point of sale.
     
  4. Does the province have a water consumption regulation for urinals that is more stringent than the federal standard?

    Neither the federal nor Nunavut governments have a regulation for urinals at the point of sale.

    Although provincial building and plumbing codes can require water efficiency standards in new construction and renovations, there is to date no
    federal regulation for mandating the water consumption/efficiency of urinals at the point of sale.
      
  5. Does the province have a water consumption regulation for clothes washers that is more stringent than the federal standard? 

    No.

    Minimum water efficiency standards for commercial and residential clothes washers are established through Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, limiting the Minimum Modified Energy Factor to greater than 35.68 L/kwh/cycle for capacity > 45 Land to greater than 18.4 L/kWh/cycle for capacities < 45 L.

  6. Does the province have a water consumption regulation for pre-rinse spray valves that is more stringent than the federal standard?  

    No.

    Minimum water efficiency standards for pre-rinse spray valves are established through Canada’s Energy Efficiency Regulations, limiting the flow rate to less than 6.1 litres per minute at 60 Psi water pressure as of January 1, 2012.

  7. Does the province have mandatory building or plumbing codes requiring water efficient products that exceed the federal standard? 

    No.
     
    Nunavut has adopted the 2005 National Building Code. 
     
  8. Does the province have any regulations or policies for water utilities regarding water loss in the utility distribution system?  

    No. 

  9. Does the province require conservation activities as part of its water permitting process or water right permit?

    No.

    The Nunavut Water Board administers water permits and does not explicitly discuss water efficiency but does have the authority to require water conservation measures as a condition of licensing or water right permits.  It should be noted that this authority has not been exercised yet. 
    The Nunavut Water Board is prohibited from issuing, renewing, or amending a licence that could have a substantial adverse affect on the quality, quantity, or rate of flow of waters through Inuit-owned land (unless the applicant has entered into an agreement with the Inuit to compensate for any loss or damage or the Board has determined the appropriate compensation). 

    Nunavut Waters and Nunavut Surface Rights Tribunal Act, S.C. 2002, c. 10 
     
     
  10. Does the province require preparation of drought emergency plans by water utilities or cities on any prescribed schedule?  

    No.

  11. Does the province have a mandatory planning requirement for potable water conservation/efficiency separate from drought emergency plans?   

    No.

  12. Does the province have the authority to approve or reject the conservation plans? 

    N/A because no plans are required.
     
  13. How often does the province require the water utilities to submit a potable water conservation plan (not part of a drought emergency plan)? 

    N/A because no plans are required.

  14. If the province has a mandatory planning requirement for potable water conservation separate from drought emergency plans, is there a framework or prescribed methodology?

    N/A because no plans are required.
     
     
  15. Does the province require water utilities to implement conservation measures, beyond just the preparation and submittal of plans? 

    N/A because no plans are required.

  16. Does the province offer financial assistance to utilities, cities, or counties for urban water conservation programs such as a revolving loan fund? Grants? Bonds? Appropriations?  Bonds?  Appropriations?

    No, with the exception of metering.
     

    Canada does not have a revolving fund for infrastructure loans. Federally, the Green Municipal Fund (GMF) administered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) provides grants for up to 50% of project costs, or below-market, low interest loans of up to 80% of project costs. FCM is an advocacy organization; however the Government of Canada endowed the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) with $550 million to establish the GMF program.

    The GMF funds municipal projects and studies, which have included feasibility studies of water conservation programs, water distribution system leak detection and control projects, plumbing retrofit programs, wastewater recycling, and sustainable community plans involving water conservation. In 2011, water conservation projects that reduce water use by more than 20% are a funding focus.

    The Building Canada plan is the primary mechanism in Canada for funding water and wastewater infrastructure, and encompasses a number of funds including provincial and municipal base funding, gas tax funds, and the Building Canada fund. Over half of the funding under the Building Canada plan is provided as base funding to municipalities, and the funds are generally administered by the provinces. The Building Canada fund promotes long-term funding of water infrastructure projects, including projects designed to improve conservation of water. Funding focuses on improved treatment standards that emphasize the protection of human health. The projects are required to be supported by measures that improve the management of sources of drinking water, reduce demands, and improve the management of drinking water infrastructure.

    All projects are cost shared, generally in equal thirds between federal/provincial/municipal governments. The Building Canada fund operates through two components: the Major Infrastructure Component (MIC) that targets large strategic projects of national and regional significance, and the Communities Component that focuses on projects in communities with populations of less than 100,000.

    To date, funded projects have focused on centralized infrastructure as opposed to conservation efforts, with the exception of metering. Capital cost funding projects must result in a tangible capital asset. Planning costs are also eligible, which could potentially support the development of water conservation plans.
     
  17. Does the province offer technical assistance for urban water conservation programs? 

    Yes.

    The Office of Drinking Water for the Department of Water Stewardship offers advice and technical assistance to the public regarding drinking water and conservation as part of the Water Protection Handbook.

    Through the Integrated Watershed Management Planning process, the Department of Water Stewardship along with Conservation Districts provides technical information to Manitobans on water conservation at the local watershed level.
       
     
  18. Does the province require volumetric billing?

    No.

    Volumetric billing is not required for municipalities, however Manitoba invoices self-supplied takings such as industrial uses and other use such as carwashes, water bottlers, water slides, and campgrounds with swimming pools.
     
     
  19. What percentage or number of publicly supplied water connections (residential and nonresidential) are metered in your province?

    44.2% residential and 95.9% commercial in the territories

    Municipal Water Use 2009 Summary Tables 

  20. Does the province provide ET microclimate information for urban landscapes? 

    No. 

  21. Does the province have a water conservation and efficiency strategy?

    No.

  22. Does the province have standards for alternative water sources?

    No.

    Additional Information:
     

    Kinkead, J. (2005) An Analysis of Canadian Water Efficiency Practices

    de Loe, et. al. (2007) Water Allocation and Water-Security Report

    Environment Canada (2011) 2009 Municipal Water Use Statistics

    Environment Canada (2011) Municipal Water Pricing Report

    Gibbon, W (2008) Who uses water-saving fixtures in the home - Canada